Aerospace Shop Finds New Productivity in Brass Parts

Three partners contributed their diverse manufacturing and machining experience—and their last initials—to found SPR Machine in Hamilton, Ohio in 2002. The machine shop has grown from a shop floor with 2,500 ft2 (232 m2) to one with 78,000 ft2 (7,246 m2) filled with 14 mills, lathes, and welding and inspection equipment. SPR produces high-quality work from 60″ (1.5 m) down to 0.0005″ (0.013 mm) for customers predominantly in the aerospace and medical industries. All that talent, experience and entrepreneurial energy make SPR Machine an open-minded shop that approaches new growth challenges with enthusiasm. One of those challenges presented itself in the form of a part-material switch from steel to brass. SPR Machine jumped at the opportunity to see how much cycle time could be saved through high-speed machining. It wound up leading the shop to new equipment, insights, personnel qualifications and a renewed respect for the versatility and machining performance of brass. The opportunity arose when co-founder and company vice president Scott Pater combined his passion to race off-road and radio-controlled (RC) cars with a friend’s engineering expertise. When the friend created a re...

Daimler Buses Relies on DyeMansion for Color & Texture Quality in 3D Printed Spare Parts

While it took decades for the rest of the world to catch up, a handful of aerospace organizations, automotive industry leaders, and other innovators have continued to enjoy the inside track on 3D printing and additive manufacturing processes—progressing from the use of polymers to metal. Daimler was one of the forerunners in using 3D printing, and as the technology has continued to pick up steam and infiltrate the mainstream, the German-headquartered company has embraced it further too, with Daimler Buses set up in 2016 to begin 3D printing spare parts. Dye Mansion recently released a case study on Daimler Buses and their successful disruption of the supply chain within their realm of the automotive industry. The initial project began with the founding of the Center of Competence 3D Printing, headed by Ralf Anderhofstadt. Selective laser sintering was tested for the production of visible spare parts in the Customers Services and Parts department as the research and development teams worked to reinvent the supply chain not just for worldwide spare part manufacturing, but also the after-sales business. Other companies such as DyeMansion, Additive Minds, and EOS were involved in th...