About six years ago, when I told people I was writing a novel about a group of activists destroying the internet, they would always ask me two questions. The first was always “why?” Tellingly, that’s not a question I get asked anymore. More often than not I’m met with a “nice,” a “right on,” or just a knowing, appreciative nod. It seems like everybody has their own reasons for destroying the internet: Trump, gamergate, Brexit, Facebook, the alt-right, revenge porn. Take your pick, it’s been a wild six years. It’s a valid one, if only because for decades we’ve been told the internet is basically indestructible, that its core foundation was ARPANET, the military computer network originally designed to survive a nuclear war. And it’s a question I was deliberately vague about answering in my book Infinite Detail; ultimately the internet is wiped out by a kind of uber-virus, a cyber weapon that’s somewhere between the Stuxnet worm and the WannaCry ransomware, that infects everything connected to the net, bricking it as it goes. But before—and after—this happens, various characters and groups in the book are using more physical methods to attack and disrupt the internet. Electromagnet...