Remote control crane operation: Heavy lifting made easy

Cranes are critical in a number of industries, including aircraft/aerospace, auto manufacturing, chemicals and minerals, pulp and paper, steel production, and utilities, as well as the grain industry, logging, rail yards, and ship loading. Traditionally, industrial cranes have been operated by human operators sitting in cabs in the cranes. In such instances, the operator’s actions are guided by the hand signals of a person outside of the crane. “In the past, cranes were operated by the cab operators,” says Brad Robinson, president of Robinson Engineering, which has been offering remote control technologies since 1962. “The guy on the ground was hooking the chains, doing the loading, and having to wave his hands to direct the operator where to move the crane.” In other cases, rather than have an operator sitting in a cab, a person outside of the crane would operate the unit, using pendant pushbutton stations suspended from the crane. In recent decades, technology has advanced to the point where cranes can be operated by remote control. While this technology has been around since the 1960s, it has continued to improve over the years, with newer system...

Electroconvulsive therapy helps patients with their symptoms in more than 80% of cases – but its

Electroconvulsive therapy helps patients with their symptoms in more than 80% of cases – but its stigma means it may not be helping the people it could. Eighty years ago at the University of Rome La Sapienza, doctors sent 100 volts of electricity through the head of a 39-year-old man. A week earlier, he had been found by the municipal police wandering the streets and muttering words that no one could understand. “He was unemotional, living passively, like a tree that does not give fruit,” wrote Ferdinando Accornero, a young psychiatrist at the university. Nonsensical, unknown, and unclaimed, the man was diagnosed with severe and advanced schizophrenia. “The illness had a poor prognosis,” Accornero added. “We concluded that we were dealing with a mentality that was completely unravelled, and gave little hope, even for partial recovery.” In just a few weeks, however, this mysterious patient would be talking again, living in his home, and sleeping in a bed next to his wife. He returned to his work as an engineer in Milan. You might also like:• How deep brain stimulation silences food cravings• Can staying awake beat depression? • How your social media betrays your mood Referred to...