MOTHER’S DAUGHTER, a play by Shaw’s Kate Hennig, is reason enough to drive a little bit west to the Stratford Festival

Buffalo Rising is a nationally recognized website that delivers highly influential content and advertising that is relevant to people living in and around Buffalo, NY. Our readers trust us to serve as one of their primary sources of local information, allowing you to reach targeted customers who are already engaged in relevant content related to your business. THE BASICS: MOTHER’S DAUGHTER, the world premiere of a play by Kate Hennig about the first queen of England, directed by Alan Dilworth, commissioned by the Stratford Festival, in their venue for new plays, the “Studio Theatre,” in repertory with four other plays at that venue, and a dozen plays and musicals overall this summer in Stratford, Ontario. (800-567-1600) www.stratfordfestival.ca  Note: MOTHER’S DAUGHTER, a no-holds barred conversation between the ghost of Catherine of Aragon and her daughter “Bloody Mary” comes with an Audience Alert: “This play contains coarse adult language and deals with mature themes. It is generally unsuitable for most children and some younger teens.” Runtime: 2 hours and 9 minutes with one 20-minute intermission THUMBNAIL SKETCH:  We meet England’s first queen, Queen Mary I, aka “Mary Tud...

Ahead of their headline set on the Pyramid Stage at Glastonbury, Ed Power looks back on

Ahead of their headline set on the Pyramid Stage at Glastonbury, Ed Power looks back on how drugs, drink and the recording process turned goth-rock troupe into ‘a powder keg ready to explode’ Summer 1982 was drawing to a fitful close when Robert Smith slid his guitar under the bed, scrubbed away the last of the mascara and packed his sleeping bag. The Cure frontman was about to step outside the door of his parent’s house in Crawley, West Sussex, and away from the goth-rock troupe he had led to unlikely success across the previous six years. He was heading into the blue yonder in a desperate attempt to silence the tumult in this head, the chaos that had come crashing down on his music career. He didn’t tell anyone but he suspected that, after four albums and a lifetime of upheaval stuffed into half a decade, it might be the end for the band. As far as Smith was concerned, The Cure were over. And so here he was, a literally unhappy camper about to hit the road. “Everything seemed to be going wrong,” Smith would recall. “So I decided to go off for a few months. I took a tent and went around England.” The Cure would rise like a moody phoenix, of course, and this Sunday they tick ano...