MIT professor Ram Sasisekharan made his name on the idea that algorithms and computer models could lead to better and more potent therapies, a promise that launched three biotech companies and attracted hundreds of millions of dollars. But two treatments purportedly discovered with Sasisekharan’s computational approach are almost identical to compounds that had previously been described by other labs, according to a new paper by outside researchers. The finding casts serious doubts on the integrity of Sasisekharan’s research, the authors claim. “We looked at exactly two cases, and in both did we find irregularities,” said Tillman Gerngross, CEO of the private biotech firm Adimab and a co-author of the paper. “To me, if you’re sitting in the kitchen and two fat cockroaches walk across the floor, what’s the chance that there’s only two?” In a paper published Monday in the journal mAbs, Gerngross and his Adimab colleagues said two antibody therapies described by Sasisekharan’s lab — one for influenza and one for Zika virus — “show striking similarities” to the past work of other scientists. Sasisekharan’s influenza therapy, described in 2017 in the Proceedings of the National Acad...